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Boozeat Picks: 3 simple food and wine pairing principles to live by

 

Pairing food and wine may seem like a complex affair, but the truth is, you really don’t need to be an expert to come up with killer wine and food pairings.

Here at Boozeat, we’re huge fans of matching food and wine (check out some of our favourites here and here). So we’ve put together 3 simple principles of wine and food pairing for you to experiment with, along with some of our favourite examples.

Match body with texture

It isn’t difficult to nail this pairing principle. The idea is to pair foods and wines with similar texture, weight and flavour, as they will end up complementing each other. Light bodied wines will go with mildly flavoured foods, and heavy bodied wines with rich and heavy foods.

Check out one of our favourites here, which is a pairing of a rich fish like Salmon with a medium to full-bodied white wine like Chardonnay. On the same principle, a rich wagyu steak pairs well with a bold red like Cabernet Sauvignon.

 

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Acid and tannin go well with fat

Tannins give wine a dry, mouth-puckering taste that cuts through the heavy flavours of fat, while the acidity in wine helps to round out flavours on your palate. This means dishes with salty and fatty flavours go well with wines that are high in tannins and acidity.

We really love pairing a crisp and acidic Sauvignon Blanc with some salty, crackling roast pork. A bold Cabernat Sauvignon would also work well with fatty cuts of beef like prime rib, ribeye or filet mignon.

 

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Image: Vintry

In principle, roast pork should pair well with dry and tannic wines. Frankly, we think roast pork goes well with anything!

Sweet foods go with sweeter wines

If you love sweet foods and wines, match the sweetness level of the food and wine you’re pairing. In order for wine to accentuate sweet flavours in food, the wine has to be sweeter than the food. If it is the other way round, the sweetness of the food will drown out the wine, resulting in flat and unpleasant tasting wine.

 

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Image: Hospitalitymagazine.com.au

Some of our favourite sweet pairings include dark chocolate with Port, Sherry or Riesling, and lemon cake or lemon tarts with a citrusy Sauvignon Blanc.

All the best with your food and wine pairing adventures! Follow us on Facebook (www.facebook.com/boozeat) and Instagram (@Boozeat) and let us know if you have any great pairing ideas of your own.

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